Timeline of Slatington History

 

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23 October 1897 (SATURDAY)

SLATINGTON'S NEW HIGH SCHOOL
A MODERN SCHOOL BUILDING PLANNED AND CONSTRUCTED ACCORDING TO THE MOST APPROVED METHIDS

Dedication

Details of the building

Source: The Slatington News, 23 October and 27 November 1897


5 July 1897 (Monday)

The First Walnut Street Bridge

THE NEW BRIDGE
THE COURT GRANTS THE WALNUT STREET BRIDGE

On Monday last, Judge Albright approved the application for a new bridge in this borough across Trout Creek at a point opposite Henry Fulmer’s hotel “The Arlington.”
The news of this fact was received by the citizens generally with much satisfaction because the erection of this bridge will, beyond doubt, be an active factor in the development and growth of Slatington, and the granting of it, is one of he most important events in the Borough’s history.
The bridge will be a handsome iron structure, it is not likely, however, that the actual work of construction can begin for several months, but great satisfaction lies in the fact that the bridge is assured, and the contest for it, which has been long and tedious, is ended.  It was in the fall of 1891, nearly 6 years ago, that the Borough Council instructed the Solicitor, Frank Jacobs, Esq., to present to the Court the petition for the bridge.  The petition was signed by upwards of 500 residents of Slatington and adjacent territory.  From that time forward Mr. Jacobs, backed by the active support of many citizens, urged the application, in the face of opposition, the commissioners then in office refusing to consider the question of a bridge owing as they said to a lack of funds, but upon the induction into office of the present commissioners, Solicitor Jacobs met with friends in his efforts, but later on new obstacles appeared in court.  Several attorneys, representing other interests, raised legal objections to the granting of the bridge, and at times it seemed that these objections might succeed; but after hearing argument three different times by Attorney Jacobs the Court gave the application its approval, thus ending a contest which if the results had been different would have retarded the expansion of the lower part of the town very materially.

Source: The Slatington News, 10 July 1897